Failed Art Attempt: Lomography

I always post finished projects but I never post all the failures or versions that didn't make the cut. I was very inspired by the Failure CV posted by a Princeton professor and thought it would be fun to share a failure!

Now we can do almost anything with our phones. Technology has automated almost every process for us. Want to be a photographer? Well, there is an ap for that. I thought I was being very authentic by buying a lomography camera and well... it was a creative disaster. This is a fun little story about the creative failure that was my attempt at lomography. 

 Here is my limited edition Jack White Holga lomography camera. OooooOOOooo AhhhhhHHHhhhh!

Here is my limited edition Jack White Holga lomography camera. OooooOOOooo AhhhhhHHHhhhh!

I thought I would get a lomography camera because it was the camera that Instagram filters are based on. Even the old Instagram logo is an illustration of a lomo camera. These toy cameras are known for their weird glitches, imperfections, and quirks. I thought using one of these basic cameras would help me understand photography on a more fundamental level. I bought this camera for $100 with the best of intentions... 2 years later I finally used it... once....

I partially read the instructions, watched youtube tutorial videos for tips and tricks, and bought some film. The film was very expensive. One roll was $11.99 and the second more fancy roll was $13.99. And did I mention you only get 12-16 photos per roll? But to be authentic you have to pay for it right? I took the camera on a long weekend vacation and soon realized having to manually advance the film was an absolute pain. I thought I was advancing it correctly for 16 photos per roll but later found out I screwed that up. You also have to manually roll the end of the film and I exposed a bunch of shots by not doing that correctly either.

I took the finished rolls to get developed. It cost me $10.99 per roll and took 10 business days to develop due to them having to be shipped out. I was asked if I just wanted the film developed. I agreed. In my mind that meant I wouldn't be getting a digital disk of my photos. Well that is not what it meant. All they gave me was the developed negatives...

 Great. Now what do I do with these?

Great. Now what do I do with these?

Turns out to get my actual pictures I had to send these back to the lab that takes 10 days! Also, looking at my negatives, they had to ask for special care with my photos because I completely screwed them up and had overlapped ever single exposure!

 You can see how these exposures are overlapped.

You can see how these exposures are overlapped.

After another 10 days I got a disc of my photos back. I was charged another $35.99 and that is when I discovered my flippin' photos were not even in color!?!?! They were all black and white! So after $150+ and 2+ years I give you the not so amazing photos I took with my very legit lomo camera.

 This triple exposure turned out gorgeous.

This triple exposure turned out gorgeous.

 I really enjoy this one too.

I really enjoy this one too.

 This headstone is from 1875.

This headstone is from 1875.

 This is my favorite image I took.

This is my favorite image I took.

 This double exposure is really haunting.

This double exposure is really haunting.

 I kinda love this one too.

I kinda love this one too.

 The overlapping exposures are really quite interesting.

The overlapping exposures are really quite interesting.

 This one is so striking.

This one is so striking.

Many of the images I took are happy accidents. The overlapping created some great effects. Do I think this handful of photos was worth the $150+ investment? Absolutely not. But I did get some beautiful art out of it by accident. And I also have some of the most hipster authentic pictures of my cats ever!

 This basically looks 100 years old.

This basically looks 100 years old.

 Classic.

Classic.